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AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka issued the statement Thursday while negotiators were meeting behind closed doors for a third straight day.
AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka gave a major address at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C., on April 4, 2017. He assessed opportunities around trade and infrastructure that could create jobs, as well as possible threats to workers' rights. President Trumka spoke about the labor movement's strategy to create a unifying agenda for working families, and the importance it places on ensuring that all workers have the right to bargain collectively for better wages and working conditions.

AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka explains why CEO Andrew Puzder, President Trump's nominee to be Secretary of Labor, is a bad choice for the office and will not be the advocate working people

RoseAnn DeMoro, president of National Nurses United, says President Trump has abandoned his campaign promises and that the "false promise of health savings accounts, which, without any effective constraints on corporate healthcare price gouging, primarily benefit the banking industry and higher income people, not those who can not afford to buy insurance now."

Read the full article on The Hill.

Donald Trump thinks the only way to make America great again is to bring back millions of manufacturing jobs, but what he and his supporters don’t get is that there’s nothing inherently great about a job in a factory. The “greatness” of a factory job had almost nothing to do with the job itself and almost everything to do with the fact that workers had some power to bargain with the bosses to get better pay, better benefits and better working conditions.

The ink wasn’t dry on Andrew Puzder’s withdrawal as secretary of labor nominee, but union leaders were celebrating. AFSCME President Lee Saunders said Puzder had “nothing but contempt for everything the Labor Department stands for.” AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka said “the power of collective action” had taken Puzder down. Thomas Perez, the former secretary of labor now running to lead the Democratic National Committee, hopped on a conference call with reporters to celebrate.

President Trump came into office on a wave of promises to look out for regular, working Americans, make the rich pay their fair share and “Make America Great Again.” That was what old time con men would call "the set up". But you can only call what has happened next "the sting".

Donald Trump will soon decide whether or not to repeal a number of pro-worker regulations that make a real difference in the lives of working people.

Read the full article in The HIll.

When the U.S. Postal Service (USPS) and Staples birthed a retail partnership in 2013, USPS said “it’s time to celebrate.” But now, that program has been sentenced to death and it is postal labor leaders who are rejoicing. They cheer the demise of a program that had been the target of a vigorous campaign by postal unions that don’t want the post office privatized.

Read the full article in The Washington Post.

The head of the AFL-CIO and House Democrats are hoping President-elect Donald Trump and his recent pick for U.S. trade representative will put workers’ rights at the top of the list of demands during trade negotiations. A group of lawmakers and AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka made the case during a news conference at the Capitol Jan. 3, a day after Trump said he will nominate Robert Lighthizer, a Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher and Flom LLP lawyer, as U.S. trade representative.

President-elect Donald Trump has nominated Andy Puzder, the CEO of the Hardee’s and Carl’s Jr. burger chains, to be America’s next labor secretary. In doing so, Trump may be drawing more attention to the plight of low-wage workers than he could have imagined. Puzder’s company violated minimum wage law by paying Hardee’s workers with pre-paid Visa debit cards.